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February 18, 2017
As the digital transformation of our economy and society is gaining ever more momentum, more and more IT-savvy criminals are trying to exploit the weaknesses and shortcomings of yet-to-be-established technologies. Oftentimes with success: 'highlights' from last year include the successful October 21 DDoS attack on DynDNS, a service that maps domain names to IP addresses, which was launched over a gigantic IoT botnet and caused long-lasting outages of popular services and web sites like Airbnb, GitHub, PayPal, and Twitter. Other felons extorted tens of thousands of dollars from hospitals whose computer systems they had previously contaminated with ransomware.
 
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February 15, 2017
Security incidents are never easy to deal with, but time and again unskilled assailants have been known to leave traces on hacked computers that enable CISOs and IT teams to protect their networks against further onslaughts – and, occasionally, to strike back. These traces typically take on the form of files that show up on a hard drive, but definitely don't belong there. However, meanwhile vicious criminals have figured out several methods to circumvent regular detection mechanisms. One of these methods is the so-called fileless attack.
 
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January 28, 2017
"Crime doesn't pay," says an old adage. Still every year statistics about so-called cyber-crimes – i.e. the online equivalent of felonies that were previously only committed in the real world – provide us with evidence to the contrary. The latest "Consumer Security Risks Survey" from Kaspersky Lab is no exception to the rule.
 
0 comments | 1432 views
January 24, 2017
As Microsoft releases updated installation media for Windows 10 v1607 (aka the Anniversary Update) through its various upgrade and licensing channels, the company also announces that support for the earliest edition will end on March 26, 2017.
 
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January 24, 2017
Cisco's WebEx branch is widely known for delivering online collaboration and conferencing tools for the enterprise. Over time, their software became so popular that browser vendors like Google and Mozilla were prompted to introduce plug-ins that enable Chrome and Firefox users to directly join a conference. With success: the Chrome extension alone is said to have 20 million active users – who could potentially fall victim to a simple yet effective security bug.
 
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January 19, 2017
Installing the quarterly Oracle Critical Patch Updates is rarely a lot of fun, but the collection available in Round 1, 2017 might cause irritation due to the sheer number of amendments.
 
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January 05, 2017
Every year, IT security pros of all experience levels welcome the arrival of what could sarcastically be dubbed the "Golden Raspberry Awards of Software" – meaning, the list of software products with the most security holes in them, as recorded by Mitre Corporation in its Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) database in the year leading up to the list's publication. The winner of the 2016 Un-Award for Most Bugs Reported was Android with a whopping 523 distinct vulnerabilities logged in the CVE.
 
0 comments | 1449 views
December 30, 2016
Allegedly named after the world's smallest mountain, Google's latest software-related initiative has nonetheless set high goals for itself: the idea is to scan the world's most popular cryptographic libraries for known weaknesses in order to help IT departments and CISOs set up secure implementations.
 
0 comments | 1398 views
December 28, 2016
We all know from experience that many long-term liaisons between browsers and operating systems were created for rational grounds rather than because of immediate or emerging bonds of sympathy between two software makers. Surprisingly enough, though, such strained relationships are often among the longest-lasting in the industry – as was the case with Mozilla's Firefox browser and Microsoft's discontinued-but-not-yet-completely-deceased OS's.
 
0 comments | 1841 views
November 05, 2016
Protecting confidential information is often considered a complicated business that's best left to the geeks who deal with it all the time. Understandable as it may be, this approach often tends to leave out the "simpler" parts of the job, like ensuring the physical security of server systems. That's where the FUJITSU SURIENT Managed Rack Solution comes into play.
 
0 comments | 1901 views
 
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